Sunday, August 03, 2008



Pomeranians are energetic and sharp dogs that are taught with no trouble, but like many small dogs housebreaking a Pomeranian can be a bit of a test. The solution to effectively potty training your Pomeranian is to begin early on and keep up a planned and prepared training timetable.

One fact you have in your support is this – Pomeranians are very hygienic by character. They dislike dirtying the place where they sleep and eat. What’s more, dogs automatically build up behavior about where they do their job. A few dogs like to go on grass, while other dogs on gravel. Determining out what your dogs likes better and using that to your benefit can assist in your house training duty.

The foremost rule while house training the Pomeranian is to fix the training spot. Given that dogs do not like to dirty their bed, you want a small spot such as a small room or a crate. When you use a crate, make certain that the dog has an adequate amount of room to move about - you cannot be expecting your Pomeranian to be pleased in an undersized constricted crate for the time of the house breaking period.

You have to use as much time in the training spot with your Pomeranian as feasible. Have fun with the dog in there and give food to the dog there as well. Make certain that your dog has a good bed and can feel all snug and cozy in the spot. Do not get disheartened if your dog does in fact eliminate in this spot in the beginning - once he makes out that this is his own area he will definitely be unwilling to do so. You can let the dog out in other places when you are able to look at him, but when you are not home, keep your dog limited to “his area”.

Next you have to put up the toilet spot. This has to be an area where your dog can get to each time he has to eliminate. You have to look at the dog and go together with him to the toilet area every time he looks like he is going to eliminate. Of course, commend him when he does so he gets the thought that going there is a good thing.

If you put your dog on a fixed feeding timetable it will become simple to guess when your dog has to eliminate. Once the dog is using the toilet spot over and over again and is not going in his training spot, you can spread out out to the other parts of the home. Make wider his training spot a bit at a time at all times keeping an eye out to make certain that he just eliminates in the toilet spot.

When you spread out into a new spot, be with your dog as much as feasible. It might be essential to put the dog back in the training spot when you are not at home until he makes out that the new spot is also his “space” and does not try to eliminate there.

Saturday, July 05, 2008



Training your dog is something that each and every owner of a pet has to associate with. You have to use time doing what requires to be done and carrying it out efficiently. Pet owners who do not train their animals effectively will have to go through difficulty down the road with misconduct and distressed neighbors. It is worthwhile to get the dog training through as soon as feasible.

But how?

How can you successfully bring into play dog training? There are a number of techniques out there and you can make an effort to try all of them. You have these choices for the reason that every person has a distinct notion or apprehension in relation to which is the top technique obtainable. You will probably employ more than one technique before you can come across something that suits you fine. Even as all these techniques work, you are the person who should execute them successfully as the owner of the pet. Read on for a few opinions to mull over on the topic of dog training.

One alternative that you have is consenting to a proficient person to do the job for you. This is to a certain extent a helpful manner in particular when you are not at home or capable to give over the time and stamina required to train the dog correctly. It can be expensive however you can in addition find dog trainers who will do it for a lot less than others.

A different technique that can be thought about in dog training is that of making use of training collars. These do the job in a range of methods. A few work by sending out a sound that is painful to the dog, if he does anything wrong. Others function by giving off a small electrical shock to the dog if he goes out of line. These techniques, both of them, are certainly of use.

And, both of these techniques are absolutely safe and sound for your pet as dog training gadgets.
Of course, you can make use of your own techniques of dog training as well. One way to keep the dog inspired when doing the right thing is to give them an award. Dog training does not have to be hard when you give consent to others to assist you to come across the right way to get the job done.

Wednesday, May 28, 2008



Arrange your puppy training to be easier and more enjoyable by comprehending that your puppy is making an effort to connect with you in further ways than barking or wiggling his tail. Keep in mind, your puppy also tries to communicate with his ears, paws, tail, mouth and more and your puppy teaching and day to day life with your dog will be to a large extent more enjoyable.

Here are a few guidelines to some fundamental body language of your dog and its meaning:

Dominant – You will come across that a dominant dog will have the ears directly up or frontward, its mouth a little open or closed, its eyes wide open or looking intently, its body standing rigid and tall with hackles perhaps lifted up, and its tail out from the body rigid or plumped up. A low down and aggressive bark can frequently be anticipated.

Friendly - A friendly dog has upraised ears, open and watchful eyes, a calm mouth, the whole rear end or tail wagging, and perhaps whining, yelping or giving out small barking sounds.

Playful - A bended over pose with the tail wagging implies, “come, let us play.”

Submissive - A dog with its ears firmly back, eyes closed and paw lifted up is presenting excessive submission. The dog is not in high spirits but shows it will not assault.

Aggressive - An aggressive dog has its ears packed down behind touching its head, its eyes tapering or testing, body on edge, mouth open to show teeth and tail held out from the body and ruffled up if possible. Growls or howls are usual.

Worried - Quick barks along with howling, ears compressed and neck hairs lifted up means "I'm worried" or "something is wrong."

Fear - A dog shows fear with a lowered posture, tail down or put underside, an curved back, looking or turning head even as showing the whites of their whites of eyes and enlarged pupils. Dogs frequently bark out of fear, in particular if they are in a tight spot, cooped up, or on a restraint.

Stressed - A dog under stress will frequently have its ears down and back, mouth wide open, and the lips being drawn backwards with fast breathing. Also tail put down, shoulders lowered, bent frontward, nervousness in attitude and it will almost certainly be shaking.

Now that you know more about what your puppy is making any effort to say to you about how he senses or the frame of mind he is in, try to put up this in your puppy training and day to day life.

In a puppy training sitting your dog should be showing that he is in a responsive or mischievous mood. If he shows he is commanding then you can make out that he may not be taking you sincerely or may well be being obstinate and you most likely have to be more forceful.

A little submissive conduct is not a bad thing as it means that that he knows that you are in command.

If your puppy turns out to be hassled, terrified, troubled or even hostile, you have got to stop your teaching and comfort your dog right away. If you have been teaching for more than 15 minutes, discontinue and take a breather. When you come back take things more leisurely or commence things in a different way.

Use your awareness in day to day life too. Watch your puppy in different circumstances and you will soon find out what he is fond of and hates or what his state of mind is. You can then take action to give him more of what he takes pleasure in and more encouragement, assurance and teaching in circumstances he finds more complex

Sunday, May 11, 2008



There is no incongruity in the idea that in the very earliest period of man's habitation of this world he made a friend and companion of some sort of aboriginal representative of our modern dog, and that in return for its aid in protecting him from wilder animals, and in guarding his sheep and goats, he gave it a share of his food, a corner in his dwelling, and grew to trust it and care for it. Probably the animal was originally little else than an unusually gentle jackal, or an ailing wolf driven by its companions from the wild marauding pack to seek shelter in alien surroundings. One can well conceive the possibility of the partnership beginning in the circumstance of some helpless whelps being brought home by the early hunters to be tended and reared by the women and children. Dogs introduced into the home as playthings for the children would grow to regard themselves, and be regarded, as members of the family

In nearly all parts of the world traces of an indigenous dog family are found, the only exceptions being the West Indian Islands, Madagascar, the eastern islands of the Malayan Archipelago, New Zealand, and the Polynesian Islands, where there is no sign that any dog, wolf, or fox has existed as a true aboriginal animal. In the ancient Oriental lands, and generally among the early Mongolians, the dog remained savage and neglected for centuries, prowling in packs, gaunt and wolf-like, as it prowls today through the streets and under the walls of every Eastern city. No attempt was made to allure it into human companionship or to improve it into docility. It is not until we come to examine the records of the higher civilisations of Assyria and Egypt that we discover any distinct varieties of canine form.

The dog was not greatly appreciated in Palestine, and in both the Old and New Testaments it is commonly spoken of with scorn and contempt as an "unclean beast." Even the familiar reference to the Sheepdog in the Book of Job "But now they that are younger than I have me in derision, whose fathers I would have disdained to set with the dogs of my flock" is not without a suggestion of contempt, and it is significant that the only biblical allusion to the dog as a recognised companion of man occurs in the apocryphal Book of Tobit (v. 16), "So they went forth both, and the young man's dog with them."

The great multitude of different breeds of the dog and the vast differences in their size, points, and general appearance are facts which make it difficult to believe that they could have had a common ancestry. One thinks of the difference between the Mastiff and the Japanese Spaniel, the Deerhound and the fashionable Pomeranian, the St. Bernard and the Miniature Black and Tan Terrier, and is perplexed in contemplating the possibility of their having descended from a common progenitor. Yet the disparity is no greater than that between the Shire horse and the Shetland pony, the Shorthorn and the Kerry cattle, or the Patagonian and the Pygmy; and all dog breeders know how easy it is to produce a variety in type and size by studied selection.

In order properly to understand this question it is necessary first to consider the identity of structure in the wolf and the dog. This identity of structure may best be studied in a comparison of the osseous system, or skeletons, of the two animals, which so closely resemble each other that their transposition would not easily be detected.

The spine of the dog consists of seven vertebrae in the neck, thirteen in the back, seven in the loins, three sacral vertebrae, and twenty to twenty-two in the tail. In both the dog and the wolf there are thirteen pairs of ribs, nine true and four false. Each has forty-two teeth. They both have five front and four hind toes, while outwardly the common wolf has so much the appearance of a large, bare-boned dog, that a popular description of the one would serve for the other.

Nor are their habits different. The wolf's natural voice is a loud howl, but when confined with dogs he will learn to bark. Although he is carnivorous, he will also eat vegetables, and when sickly he will nibble grass. In the chase, a pack of wolves will divide into parties, one following the trail of the quarry, the other endeavouring to intercept its retreat, exercising a considerable amount of strategy, a trait which is exhibited by many of our sporting dogs and terriers when hunting in teams.

A further important point of resemblance between the Canis lupus and the Canis familiaris lies in the fact that the period of gestation in both species is sixty-three days. There are from three to nine cubs in a wolf's litter, and these are blind for twenty-one days. They are suckled for two months, but at the end of that time they are able to eat half-digested flesh disgorged for them by their dam or even their sire.

The native dogs of all regions approximate closely in size, coloration, form, and habit to the native wolf of those regions. Of this most important circumstance there are far too many instances to allow of its being looked upon as a mere coincidence. Sir John Richardson, writing in 1829, observed that "the resemblance between the North American wolves and the domestic dog of the Indians is so great that the size and strength of the wolf seems to be the only difference.

It has been suggested that the one incontrovertible argument against the lupine relationship of the dog is the fact that all domestic dogs bark, while all wild Canidae express their feelings only by howls. But the difficulty here is not so great as it seems, since we know that jackals, wild dogs, and wolf pups reared by bitches readily acquire the habit. On the other hand, domestic dogs allowed to run wild forget how to bark, while there are some which have not yet learned so to express themselves.

The presence or absence of the habit of barking cannot, then, be regarded as an argument in deciding the question concerning the origin of the dog. This stumbling block consequently disappears, leaving us in the position of agreeing with Darwin, whose final hypothesis was that "it is highly probable that the domestic dogs of the world have descended from two good species of wolf (C. lupus and C. latrans), and from two or three other doubtful species of wolves namely, the European, Indian, and North African forms; from at least one or two South American canine species; from several races or species of jackal; and perhaps from one or more extinct species"; and that the blood of these, in some cases mingled together, flows in the veins of our domestic breeds.

Monday, May 05, 2008

How to Stop Bad Dog Behaviors

How to Stop Bad Dog Behaviors

Many families take a lot of joy out of having a pet. Dogs are often viewed as the ideal pet because you can interact so much with them. You can teach a dog tricks, take it for a walk, and it will always be a loyal companion. Some dogs like to test their owner’s patience by acting out. This may be in the form of barking non-stop, biting things around the house, or digging holes in the back yard. No pet owner wants to have to deal with bad dog behaviors like this. It’s not only frustrating, but it’s time consuming as well, if you don’t know how to effectively correct the problem.

Adopting an animal when it is very young usually helps to initiate a lasting bond. Once a small puppy is taken from its mother, it relies on its owner for direction. It is at this stage that you want to start reinforcing certain things. One of the most troublesome bad dog behaviors is playing with items the animal shouldn’t be. Typically this is slippers, or small kids’ toys, it can even be expensive purses or shoes. The dog has no idea what is and isn’t a toy, so it just assumes everything is. The owner should be mindful of what it left within the dog’s reach and if he or she notices the dog picking up something it shouldn’t be, a firm “no” always helps. Repetition is often necessary to ensure the dog understands the rule and to correct this type of dog behavior problems.

Accidents in the home sometimes occur and if they aren’t dealt with swiftly, the problem can be a persistent one. Many puppies relieve themselves wherever and whenever the mood strikes them. This is one of the bad dog behaviors that can really impact your life. It’s important for the owner to take the dog outside at regular intervals when it is young so it becomes accustomed to not going inside the house. If that’s not possible, you can paper train the dog, which is also very helpful.

Biting is another issue that some dog owners find themselves facing. Typically it’s not that the dog is meaning to bite anyone. It’s more that the dog is playing and nips at the person. This is especially troubling if you have young children in the home. Correcting bad dog behaviors like this is really important. You don’t want to end up having a dog that bites people who are at your home visiting. This could have very serious results so you need to work with the dog, by scolding it when it does attempt to play in this fashion.

It’s so nice to have a pet for the entire family to enjoy. With a little work and commitment you can train your dog to be a wonderful and loving companion for years to come. Dog behavior problems can always be corrected if you take the right approach

Monday, April 21, 2008


Every dog owner must take up dog training to know and handle a dog better. Appreciating a well-mannered dog is something that all can do, training is what makes things difficult. Now, there are many kinds of dog training available but not all will suit your dog.

Most dog owners and also people in general are unaware of the various kinds of dog trainings provided. The types of dog training change with the varying stages of development in the dog.

While some dogs have never been trained, some others have already undertaken training before. Therefore, it becomes all the more essential to analyze and know what type of dog training your dog needs.

The first level of dog training is the basic dog training. The basic training is meant for beginners — either a puppy or a grown-up dog that is being trained for the first time. This level includes only the rudiments — how to make a dog sit, stay and come when called. Some part of it also aims at teaching the dog to socialize with other dogs and people in a proper way. This is particularly given to puppies. And if your dog had never taken training before, this basic level is where to start with.

The next level is the intermediate level. This level of dog training is not for puppies, but for those adult dogs that have undertaken the basics either formally or at home by their own owners. This intermediate type of training trains a dog to heel, walk properly on a leash, fetch something and return. It also revises the basics of sitting, staying and coming etc.

The third and final type of dog training is the advanced course. This level is only meant for those dogs which have been through a minimum of one training course before and have passed it too. Here, in the advanced level, the different elements of the basic and intermediate courses are revised in details right at the start of the course. Then it goes to train the dog to act according to various commands and hand signals like “come”, “stay”, “sit”, “heel”, “fetch”, “lie down” et al.

When the dog gets accustomed to hand signals, the advanced course takes care of teaching the dog how to walk and stay beside the master at all times even without a leash. It also teaches the dog to have focus in its master, that is, to pay attention and stop getting distracted. The advanced level of dog training is usually suited to very obedient and well-mannered dogs.

Like all good trainings, dog trainings should also have motivators like prizes and rewards to yield better and more positive results. Hitting and yelling at the dog to make it pick up one action is not a wise technique while training. Instead of being a success, chances are that it will give negative output. So you must make sure that the dog training you assign your dog is a positive one, which indulges in positive strategies.

You must also be careful about choosing the right course for your dog—the course best-suited to it. That way, you may soon be able to boast of owning a dog that is obedient, well-mannered, well adjusted and the perfect pet one can have!

Saturday, March 29, 2008

Training your Dog using a Clicker

Clicker Method to Train Your Dog

If you are looking to train your dog you might consider using the ‘popular clicker training’ method, which has recently been picked up amongst dog trainers all over the country. Trainers in this method make use of a clicker, a tiny plastic box with a metal button which makes a distinctive click sound once the button has been pressed. The training method is simple and is in many ways parallel to the positive training method. Here is what you have to do. Decide on a certain behavior which you want to teach or reinforce your dog to do. A number of behaviors/actions come naturally to the dog like sitting, eating, standing, barking etc. and these need just to be reinforced so that your dog knows when you want him to do what. Various other actions like acting dead, shaking hands, rolling over etc. do not come naturally to the dog and need to be taught. Clicker training can be used to do both.

Clicker training works according to the basic principles of operant conditioning, by associating the sound of the clicker with a food item which the dog particularly likes. Now all you have to do is use the clicker to command the dog to do something, the dog, given that he associates the sound of the clicker with the food, immediately obliges and the training is complete.

Let us take an example to illustrate the method better, suppose you want to teach your dog to sit, you put a cookie on your dog's nose playfully and then move it upwards, the dog will obviously follow the movement of the biscuit with its nose and will then naturally rest its posterior on the floor, thereby putting himself in a sitting position. Now time your clicking to be so accurate as to occur right as the dog seats himself, now give him the biscuit and praise him. Continue doing this for sometime till the dog begins to associate the clicking with the food until the click makes him sit without you luring him with treats. Now teach him another behavior, but remember to attach the clicking cue only once the animal himself offers you the behavior otherwise the clicking will not be connected to anything in the dog's head and he will be confused regarding what it means.

Your dog is one smart little animal and it's time you gave him due credit for that. A number of trainers have been known to use negative reinforcement techniques alongside the clicker method but this simply doesn’t work because punishment at all times creates a number of unwanted behavior even if it serves the primary purpose of teaching the dog to not do something temporarily.

Any kind of training is a strenuous and rigorous process and needs time and patience. Although clicker training method has a high success rate it might not work for certain types of dogs, if you see that it’s not working for your pet you would be well advised to use some other technique to teach it tricks.

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